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to hearing your testimony. testimony. >> chairman feinstein, vice-chairman chambliss, members of the committee i'm honored to appear before you today as the president's nominee-- >> would you halt, please? we'll ask the police to please remove this woman. . [woman talking in audience] >> please remove-- i'm going to say once again that we welcome everyone here, that we expect no clapping, we expect no hissing. we expect no demonstration in this room. this is a very serious hearing. i will stop the hearing and i will ask the room to be cleared. so know that. please continue, mr. brennan. >> thank you, chairman. i'm honored to appear before you today as the president's nominee to lead the central intelligence agent. i'm grateful to president obama for sending my name forward. thank you for your service to our nation and strong support for those who defend it. this includes the extraordinary men and women of the cia, and inintelligence community so many of whom like me call virginia home and call you our senator. i would the not be here today without the love and support of my w
. dianne feinstein said she will look into new legislation to govern overseas strikes. there was an interruption by protesters. it is three and a half hours. >> you are a disgrace to democracy. >> if the police will clear the room, please. will clear the room, please. [indiscernible] [shouting continues] >> [indiscernible] please clear the room. >> [indiscernible] please clear the room. [protest continues] all right, i think we should clear the entire room and then let people back in. what do you think? >> we need more capital police. >> yeah, let's -- [indiscernible] ok, we will try and start. ok, we will i am going to began this -- begin this hearing, and let me say right up front that the process is that people are respectful, that they do not shout, they do not hiss, they do not show signs, that this is to listen. if that is a problem for anybody, i ask you to leave their room now. -- the room now. what we will do is remove you from the room. let there be no doubt. so if i may, i would like to begin. the committee meets today in open session to consider the nominat
automatically and guns t banned under dianne feinstein's law. when the department of homeland security uses them they are used in self-defense. but when i want to use it's considered, i do. >> sean: first of all, it's none of your business. i'm a shooter and that is why i look it. you said a gun is not your best option? >> no. >> sean: so a shooter comes in here. what are you going to do? are you going to grab scissors? >> i'm going to try to exit as quickly as possible. i think the bottom line you are more likely to be shot by law enforcement that arrives on the scene and don't know that you are a bystander and actual shooter. in tucson someone arrived with a gun.... >> sean: do you know how silly this sounds. if you can't get behind a desk and you can't call 911 and if you can't go to where the shooter is, treating like you are in kindergarten. then they are saying use a scissors. then we're going to use scissors. that is ridiculous. >> your keys will be locked in your desk. why do the department of homeland security that it's a great weapon for self-defense but not a great defense for regular
and joe biden and dianne feinstein and chuck schumer and 24 other democrats in the senate and all but one of the republicans in the senate all voted yes. and yeah, there were democrats who were against the war from the beginning. and that one republican, lincoln chaffee. but there were enough democrats who said yes and went along with it. that's part of the reason the war happened. the difference over time is that republican chuck hagel and most of the democrats who were wrong about iraq, they figured out that they were wrong and they turned against the war and ultimately they tried to end the war because it had been a mistake. we can say mistake in the technical sense here, right? the war was started to go get weapons of mass destruction from saddam and to stop saddam from helping al qaeda. well, saddam had no relationship with al qaeda that we were stopping. and saddam had no weapons of mass destruction. it was wrong. the war was factually wrong. right? we have learned that. this is not a controversial assertion. john mccain led the senate today in trying ton just stop chuck hagel from
group on the senate intelligence committee, not the chair, dianne feinstein who we'll be talking to tomorrow. but ron widen is asking this question and down at the retreat in annapolis, he told our own mike viqueira, every american has the right to know when their government believes that it is allowed to kill them. >> you know, this is an issue that puts president obama at odds with his base. when he came into the white house, he was very critical of the bush administration for waterboarding, for enhanced -- he called for more transparency. the administration has not been transparent. it's only because of a leak that we know as much as we do about the targeting of american, how it's done, when it's allowed. and that's why we're going to have a discussion about this and that's also why it does not imperil brennan's nomination. because the people who are most distressed about there are part of the core democratic groups that are going to vote with the president i think when it comes to john brennan. but it is an opportunity to have a conversation that we have not had yet. >> and o
interrogation techniques. the targeted killing program and the use of drones. diane feinstein gavels in the hearing after an interruption from protesters. >> i ask that this room be cleared right now with the capitol police -- will the capitol police please come in and clear a room? -- clear the room? all signs out. if the capitol police will clear a room, please. [indiscernible] >> please clear the room. please clear the room. all right. we should clear the entire room and let people back in. >> we need more capitol police is what we need. will trylet's -- we and start. [gavel] >> begin this hearing and let me say right up front that the process is that people are respectful, that they cannot tear, they do not hiss, they do not show signs. this is to listen. if that is a problem for anybody ask you to leave the room now. because what we will do is remove you from the room. let there be no doubt. so if i may, i would like to begin. the committee meets today in open session to consider the nomination of john brennan to be the 21st director of the central intelligence agency and the fi
example. senator feinstein's subcommittee -- she had a hearing last year. general cartwright and admiral pickering -- or ambassador pickering testified, and they went into this. any action we would take would have to be negotiated, it would have to be bilateral, no unilateral action, and they made that point again on the record in front of senator feinstein's subcommittee. and i support that. i agree with that. >> i have another statement from the report. the united states icbm rapid reaction posture remains in operation and runs a real risk of accidental or mistaken launch. i think that statement is pretty clear. do you agree with that? >> yes. i mean, i the accidental launch and those kinds of things are always to be concerned about, and we need to assure as we have over the years that that does not happen, but on the russian -- >> that we will run a real risk of accident or mistaken launch? >> if you put just "risk," but there's always a risk. when we are talking about nuclear weapons, and the consequences, as you know, you do not get a lot of second chances. we need to be very sure a
cuomo and senator feinstein suggested they could just have everything registered means they could have a forced by back i do you own that they will sell it to a government which is confiscation. but there are other reasons why we did not want the federal registry, one is where somebody in new york with they got the list of owners and results have not been good. there was a time assume all the best motives of the government, they could lock in the vault but we cannot even check your -- superior national defense secrets, if you go through the system they can check you but they cannot keep the record because it is checked. canada imposed a registry that they just abolished because it costs millions of dollars in did not do anything. between the '60s and '80s they had to keep track of the ignition and they finally said it makes no sense. ammunition is a commodity with tens of paperwork. so what works and what doesn't? >> you mentioned democrats better members of your organization it seems maybe the most prominent is harry reid. or maybe at one point* for my kid you characterize your relati
think the hardest sell on the hill right now will be senator feinstein's all-out assault weapons ban she's introduced. that's going to be a hard sell to those conservative democrats who are up for re-election in 2014, senators like mark baggage of alaska, max baucus of montana. that's going to be the hardest sell. universal background checks i think is where the consensus is building, although the senate judiciary hearing on tuesday or wednesday, one of the things that happened was that the national rifle association said that is not something that they can get behind. so you know, they're definitely going to be scoring those votes. i think it's going to be a harder sell than maybe folks originally thought when it comes to universal background checks. >> let's take a look at what's happening in massachusetts. lauren, scott scott brown saying he's not going to run for the senate seat opened up by john kerry. wasn't that the best hope republicans had to get that seat? >> a poll came out showing he had a slight lead on the democrat's candidate, ed marquee. i think he really was one of the b
. this is prior to the law. senator feinstein suggested if they could get registered, they could have forced buybacks. in modern times, there are two other reasons why you do not want a federal registry. one was in new york and someone got a hold of the list. the results have been not good. there was a time when all of the best motives on the part of the government. they could take a list and lock it in the vault and be secure. we cannot even secure national defense secrets now. the arts are that if we kept that registry -- and it is illegal now. if you go to the system, they can check you but they cannot keep the record. it is checked and then there is no cost to canada had a big registry but they just stopped it because it did not do anything. in the 60's and the 80's, people had to keep track of ammunition sales. finally the government said this makes no sense because ammunition is a commodity and that does not do any good. it takes tons and tons of paperwork to look at it. the question is what works and what doesn't work. >> you mentioned that there are plenty of democrats who were membe
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)